Little Talks
to have with your 2- to 5-year-old

Little Talks
to have with your 13- to 15-year-old.

Little Talks
to have with your
2- to 5-year-old

1

Discuss how some things are private.

Now is the time to start teaching your child about privacy. They need to know that nudity and touching their genitals are not appropriate in public. You can bring up privacy when they’re bathing or changing, explaining to them that some things should happen only in the bathroom (like washing their private parts) or in private (like changing their clothes or touching their genitals).

Now is the time to start teaching your child about privacy. They need to know that nudity and touching their genitals are not appropriate in public. You can bring up privacy when they’re bathing or changing, explaining to them that some things should happen only in the bathroom (like washing their private parts) or in private (like changing their clothes or touching their genitals).

2

Teach them the names of their body parts.

At this age kids may have picked up euphemisms or slang terms for their body parts. Continue using and teaching them the appropriate names and discourage the use of slang terms. This will help them communicate more effectively if something is wrong or if someone has touched them inappropriately.

At this age kids may have picked up euphemisms or slang terms for their body parts. Continue using and teaching them the appropriate names and discourage the use of slang terms. This will help them communicate more effectively if something is wrong or if someone has touched them inappropriately.

3

Tell them about safe touch versus uncomfortable touch.

Teach them that different types of touch may make them feel safe or uncomfortable. Uncomfortable touch is anything that makes them feel sad, upset, or awkward. Explain that sometimes even people they love may make them feel uncomfortable accidentally, but they should always let you know if someone has touched them in any way that made them feel uncomfortable.

Teach them that different types of touch may make them feel safe or uncomfortable. Uncomfortable touch is anything that makes them feel sad, upset, or awkward. Explain that sometimes even people they love may make them feel uncomfortable accidentally, but they should always let you know if someone has touched them in any way that made them feel uncomfortable.

4

Inform them that no one else has rights to their body.

Explain that their body belongs to them and no one else. No one else has the right to look at or touch their body without their consent. Tell them that even trusted grown-ups like doctors shouldn’t look at their body without a parent or caregiver present.

Explain that their body belongs to them and no one else. No one else has the right to look at or touch their body without their consent. Tell them that even trusted grown-ups like doctors shouldn’t look at their body without a parent or caregiver present.

5

Explain that no means no.

Whether they say no or someone else tells them no, it needs to be respected. If your child is affectionate, explain that not everyone may want hugs or kisses. If your child doesn’t like to be touched by others, help them enforce that boundary.

Whether they say no or someone else tells them no, it needs to be respected. If your child is affectionate, explain that not everyone may want hugs or kisses. If your child doesn’t like to be touched by others, help them enforce that boundary.