get the facts

Accurate information empowers you to protect your loved ones.

30% of sexual abuse perpetrators are family members
30% of sexual abuse perpetrators are family members

FACTS & CITED SOURCES

We know how important protecting your child from sexual abuse is, so we work to provide credible information. Here are some of our sources.

1 in 5 children is sexually abused before they turn 18

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “About the CDC-Kaiser ACE Study,” 2016, https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/about.html.

Children know their perpetrator in 90% of sexual abuse cases

National Sex Offender Public Website, U.S. Department of Justice, “Raising Awareness about Sexual Abuse: Facts and Statistics,” https://www.nsopw.gov/en-US/Education/FactsStatistics.

30% of sexual abuse perpetrators are family members

National Sex Offender Public Website, U.S. Department of Justice, “Raising Awareness about Sexual Abuse: Facts and Statistics,” https://www.nsopw.gov/en-US/Education/FactsStatistics.

Children with disabilities are 3 times more likely to be victims of sexual abuse

Patricia M. Sullivan and John F. Knutson, “Maltreatment and Disabilities: A Population-Based Epidemiological Study,” Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol. 24, No. 10, 2000, p. 1261.

Sexual abuse can lead to increased risk of substance abuse

David M. Fergusson, Geraldine F. H. McLeod, and L. John Horwood, “Childhood Sexual Abuse and Adult Development Outcomes: Findings from a 30-year Longitudinal Study in New Zealand,” Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol. 37, 2013, p. 665.

Sexual abuse can lead to increased risk of unhealthy relationships

Barbara Krahé and Anja Berger, “Gendered Pathways from Child Sexual Abuse to Sexual Aggression Victimization and Perpetration in Adolescent and Young Adulthood,” Child Abuse and Neglect Vol. 63, 2017, p. 261.

With proper support, children who are abused can return to healthy living

C. Thresa Yancey and David J. Hansen, “Relationship of Personal, Familial, and Abuse-Specific Factors with Outcome Following Childhood Sexual Abuse,” Aggression and Violent Behavior, Vol. 15, 2010, p. 413.

Age-appropriate conversations reduce the risk for sexual abuse

Sandy K. Wurtele and Maureen C. Kenny, “Normative Sexuality Development in Childhood: Implications for Developmental Guidance and Prevention of Childhood Sexual Abuse,” Counseling and Human Development, Vol. 43 No. 9, 2011, p. 4.

Abuse survivors often don’t disclose their abuse until adulthood

Canadian Centre for Child Protection, Child Sexual Abuse: It Is Your Business, 2014, p. 10, https://www.cybertip.ca/pdfs/C3P_ChildSexualAbuse_ItIsYourBusiness_en.pdf.

34% of youth internet users experience unwanted exposure to sexual material

Jane Wolak, Kimberly Mitchell, and David Finkelhor, “Online Victimization of Youth: Five Years Later, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, 2006, p. 29, http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/pdf/CV138.pdf.

NOW THAT YOU KNOW THE FACTS, TAKE ACTION